So you want to write a research paper

The Audio Engineering research team here submit a lot of conference papers. In our internal reviewing and when we review submissions by others, certain things come up again and again. I’ve compiled all this together as some general advice for putting together a research paper for an academic conference, especially in engineering or computer science. Of course, there are always exceptions, and the advice below doesn’t always apply. But its worth thinking of this as a checklist to catch errors and issues in an early draft.

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Abstract
Make sure the abstract is self-contained. Don’t assume the person reading the abstract will read the paper, or vice-versa. Avoid acronyms. Be sure to actually say what the results were and what you found out, rather than just saying you applied the techniques and analysed the data that came out.
The abstract is part summary of the paper, and part an advertisement for why someone should read the paper. And keep in mind that far more people read the abstract than read the paper itself.
Introduction
Make clear what the problem is and why it is important. Why is this paper needed, and what is going to distinguish this paper from the others?
In the last paragraph, outline the structure of the rest of the paper. But make sure that it is specific to the structure of the paper.

Background/state of the art/prior work – this could be a subsection of introduction, text within the introduction, or its own section right after the introduction. What have others done, what is the most closely related work? Don’t just list a lot of references. Have something to say about each reference, and relate them to the paper. If a lot of people have approached the same or similar problems, consider putting the methods into a table, where for each method, you have columns for short description, the reference(s), their various properties and their assumptions. If you think no one has dealt with your topic before, you probably just haven’t looked deep enough 😉 . Regardless, you should still explain what is the closest work, perhaps highlighting how they’ve overlooked your specific problem.

Problem formulation – after describing state of the art, this could be a subsection of introduction, text within the introduction, or its own section. Give a clear and unambiguous statement of the problem, as you define it and as it is addressed herein. The aim here is to be rigorous, and remove any doubt about what you are doing. It also allows other work to be framed in the same way. When appropriate, this is described mathematically, e.g., we define these terms, assume this and that, and we attempt to find an optimal solution to the following equation.

Method/Analysis/Results
The structure of this, the core of the paper, is highly dependent on the specific work. One good approach is to have quite a lot of figures and tables. Then most of the writing is mainly just explaining and discusses these figures and tables, and the ordering of these should be mostly clear.
A typical ordering is
Describe the method, giving block diagrams where appropriate
Give any plots that analyse and illustrate the method, but aren’t using the method to produce results that address the problem
Present the results of using your method to address the problem. Keep the interpretation of the results here short, unless detailed explanation of a result it is needed to justify the next result that is presented. If there is lengthy discussion or interpretation, then leave that to a discussion section.

Equations and notation
For most papers in signal processing and related fields, at least a few equations are expected. The aim with equations is always to make the paper more understandable and less ambiguous. So avoid including equations just for the sake of it, avoid equations if they are just an obvious intermediate step, or if they aren’t really used in any way (e.g. ‘we use the Fourier transform, which by the way, can be given in this equation. Moving on…’), do use equations if they clear up any confusion when a technical concept is explained just with text.
Make sure every equation can be fully understood. All terms and notation should be defined, right before or right after they are used in the text. The logic or process of going from one equation to the next should be made clear.
Tables and figures
Where possible, these should be somewhat self-contained. So one should be able to look at a figure and understand it without reading the paper. If that isn’t possible, then it should be understood just by looking at the figure and figure caption. If not, then by just looking at the figure, caption and a small amount of text where the figure is described.
Figure captions typically go immediately below figures, but table captions typically above tables.
Label axes in figures wherever possible, and give units. If units are not appropriate, make clear that an axis is unitless. For any text within a figure, make sure that the font size used is close to the font size of the main text in the paper. Often, if you import a figure from software intending for viewing on a screen (like matlab), then the font can appear miniscule when the figure is imported into a paper.
Make sure all figures and tables are numbered and are all referenced, by their number, in the main text. Position them close to where they are first mentioned in the text. Don’t use phrasing that refers to their location, like ‘the figure below’ or ‘the table on the next page’, partly because their location may change in the final version.
Make sure all figures are high quality. Print out the paper before submitting and check that it all looks good, is high resolution, and nicely formatted.

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Discussion/Future work/conclusion
Discussion and future work may be separate sections or part of the conclusion. Discussion is useful if the results need to be interpreted, but is often kept very brief in short papers where the results may speak for themselves.
Future work is not about what the author plans to do next. Its about research questions that arose or were not addressed, and research directions that are worth pursuing. The answers to these research questions may be pursued by the author or others. Here, you are encouraging others to build on the work in this paper, and suggesting to them the most promising directions and approaches. Future work is usually just a couple sentences or couple paragraphs at the end of conclusion, unless there is something particularly special about it.
The conclusion should not simply repeat the abstract or summarise the paper, though there may be an element of that. Its about getting across what were the main things that the reader should take away and remember. What was found out? What was surprising? What are the main insights that arose? If the research question is straightforward and directly addressed, what was the answer?

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References
The most important criterion for references is to cite wherever it justifies a claim, clarifies a point, identifies where an idea is coming from someone else, or helps the reader find pertinent additional material. If you’re dealing with a very niche or underexplored topic, you may wish to give a full review of all existing literature on the subject.
Aim for references to come from high impact, recent peer reviewed journal articles, or as close to that as possible. So for instance, choose a journal over a conference article if you can, but maybe a highly cited conference paper over an obscure journal paper.
Avoid using web site references. If the reference is essentially just a URL, then put that directly in the text or as a footnote, but not as a citation. And no one cares when you accessed the website so no need to say ‘accessed on [date]’. If it’s a temporary record that may have only been there for a short period of time before the paper submission date, its probably not a reliable reference, won’t help the reader and you should probably find an alternative citation.
Check your reference formatting, especially if you use someone else’s reference library or some automatically generated citations. For instance some citations will have a publisher and a conference name, so it reads as ‘the X Society Conference, published by the X Society.
Be consistent. So for instance, have all references use author initials, or none of them. Always use journal abbreviations, or never use them. Always include the city of a conference, or never do it. And so on.

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