Female pioneers in audio engineering

The Heyser lecture is a distinguished talk given at each AES Convention by eminent individuals in audio engineering and related fields. At the 140th AES Convention, Rozenn Nicol was the Heyser lecturer. This was well-deserved, and she has made major contributions to the field of immersive audio. But what was shocking about this is that she is the first woman Heyser lecturer. Its an indicator that woman are under-represented and under-recognised in the field. With that in mind, I’d like to highlight some women who have made major contributions to the field, especially in research and innovation.

  • Birgitta Berglund led major research into the impact of noise on communities. Her influential research resulted in guidelines from the World Health Organisation, and greatly advanced our understanding of noise and its effects on society. She was the 2009 IOA Rayleigh medal recipient.
  • Marina Bosi is a past AES president of the AES. She has been instrumental in the development of standards for audio coding and digital content management standards and formats, including develop the AC-2, AC-3, and MPEG-2 Advanced Audio Coding technologies,
  • Anne-Marie Bruneau has been one of the most important researchers on electrodynamic loudspeaker design, exploring motion impedance and radiation patterns, as well as establishing some of the main analysis and measurement approaches used today. She co-founded the Laboratoire d’Acoustique de l’Université du Maine, now a leading acoustics research center.
  • Ilene J. Busch-Vishniac is responsible for major advances in the theory and understanding of electret microphones, as well as patenting several new designs. She received the ASA R. Bruce Lindsay Award in 1987, and the Silver Medal in Engineering Acoustics in 2001. President of the ASA 2003-4.
  • Elizabeth (Betsy) Cohen was the first female president of the Audio Engineering Society. She was presented with the AES Fellowship Award in 1995 for contributions to understanding the acoustics and psychoacoustics of sound in rooms. In 2001, she was presented with the AES Citation Award for pioneering the technology enabling collaborative multichannel performance over the broadband internet.
  • crumPoppy Crum is head scientist at Dolby Laboratories whose research involves computer research in music and acoustics. At Dolby, she is responsible for integrating neuroscience and knowledge of sensory perception into algorithm design, technological development, and technology strategy.
  • Delia Derbyshire (1937-2001) was an innovator in electronic music who pushed the boundaries of technology and composition. She is most well-known for her electronic arrangement of the theme for Doctor Who, an important example of Musique Concrète. Each note was individually crafted by cutting, splicing, and stretching or compressing segments of analogue tape which contained recordings of a plucked string, oscillators and white noise. Here’s a video detailing a lot of the effects she used, which have now become popular tools in digital music production.
  •  Ann Dowling is the first female president of the Royal Academy of Engineering. Her research focuses on noise analysis and reduction, especially from engines, and she is a leading educator in acoustics. A quick glance at google scholar shows how influential her research has been.
  • Marion Downs was an audiometrist at Colorado Medical Center in Denver, who invented the tests used to measure hearing both In newly born babies and in fetuses.
  • Judy Dubno is Director of Hearing Research at the Medical University of South Carolina. Her research focuses on human auditory function, with emphasis on the processing of auditory information and the recognition of speech, and how these abilities change in adverse listening conditions, with age, and with hearing loss. Recipient of the James Jerger Career Award for Research in Audiology from the American Academy of Audiology and Carhart Memorial Lecturer for the American Auditory Society. President of the ASA in 2014-15.
  • thumb_FiebrinkPhoto3Rebecca Fiebrink researches Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and its application of machine learning to real-time, interactive, and creative domains. She is the creator of the popular Wekinator, which allows anyone to use machine learning to build new musical instruments, real-time music information retrieval and audio analysis systems, computer listening systems and more.
  • Katherine Safford Harris pioneered EMG studies of speech production and auditory perception. Her research was fundamental to speech recognition, speech synthesis, reading machines for the blind, and the motor theory of speech perception. She was elected Fellow of the ASA, the AAAS, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and the New York Academy of Sciences. She was President of the ASA (2000-2001), awarded the Silver Medal in 2005 and Gold Medal in 2007.
  • Rhona Hellman was a Fellow of the ASA. She was a distinguished hearing scientist and preeminent expert in auditory perceptual phenomena. Her research spanned almost 50 years, beginning in 1960. She tackled almost every aspect of loudness, and the work resulted in major advances and developments of loudness standards.
  • Mara Helmuth developed software for composition and improvisation involving granular synthesis. Throughout the 1990s, she paved the way forward by exploring and implementing systems for collaborative performance over the Internet. From 2008-10 she was President of the International Computer Music Association.
  • Carleen_HutchinsCarlene Hutchins (1911-2009) was a leading researcher in the study of violin acoustics, with over a hundred publications in the field. She was founder and president of the Catgut Society, an organization devoted to the study and appreciation of stringed instruments .
  • Sophie Germain (1776-1831) was a French mathematician, scientist and philosopher. She won a major prize from the French Academy of Sciences for developing a theory to explain the vibration of plates due to sound. The history behind her contribution, and the reactions of leading French mathematicians to having a female of similar calibre in their midst, is fascinating. Joseph Fourier, whose work underpins much of audio signal processing, was a champion of her work.
  • Bronwyn Jones was a psychoacoustician at the CBS Technology Center during the 70s and 80s. In seminal work with co-author Emil Torrick, she developed one of the first loudness meters, incorporating both psychoacoustic principles and detailed listening tests. It paved the way for what became major initiatives for loudness measurement, and in some ways outperforms the modern ITU 1770 standard
  • Bozena Kostek is editor of the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society. Her most significant contributions include the applications of neural networks, fuzzy logic and rough sets to musical acoustics, and the application of data processing and information retrieval to the psychophysiology of hearing. Her research has garnered dozens of prizes and awards.
  • Daphne Oram (1925 –2003) was a pioneer of ‘musique concrete’ and a central figure in the evolution of electronic music. She devised the Oramics technique for creating electronic sounds, co-founded the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, and was possibly the first woman to direct an electronic music studio, to set up a personal electronic music studio and to design and construct an electronic musical instrument.
  • scalettiCarla Scaletti is an innovator in computer generated music. She designed the Kyma sound generation computer language in 1986 and co-founded Symbolic Sound Corporation in 1989. Kyma is one of the first graphical programming languages for real time digital audio signal processing, a precursor to MaxMSP and PureData, and is still popular today.
  • Bridget Shield was professor of acoustics at London Southbank University. Her research is most significant in our understanding of the effects of noise on children, and has influenced many government initiatives. From 2012-14, she was the first female President of the Institute of Acoustics.
  • Laurie Spiegel created one of the first computer-based music composition programs, Music Mouse: an Intelligent Instrument, which also has some early examples of algorithmic composition and intelligent automation, both of which are hot research topics today.
  • maryMary Desiree Waller (1886-1959) wrote a definitive treatise on Chladni figures, which are the shapes and patterns made by surface vibrations due to sound, see Sophie Germain, above. It gave far deeper insight into the figures than any previous work.
  • Megan (or Margaret) Watts-Hughes is the inventor of the Eidophone, an early instrument for visualising the sounds made by your voice. She rediscovered this simple method of generating Chladni figures without knowledge of Sophie Germain or Ernst Chladni’s work. There is a great description of her experiments and analysis in her own words.

The Eidophone, demonstrated by Grace Digney.

Do you know some others who should be mentioned? We’d love to hear your thoughts.

Thanks to Theresa Leonard for information on past AES presidents. She was the third female president.  will be the fourth.

And check out Women in Audio: contributions and challenges in music
technology and production for a detailed analysis of the current state of the field.

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