Creative projects in sound design and audio effects

This past semester I taught two classes (modules), Sound Design and Digital Audio Effects. In both classes, the final assignment involves creating an original work that involves audio programming and using concepts taught in class. But the students also have a lot of free reign to experiment and explore their own ideas.

The results are always great. Lots of really cool ideas, many of which could lead to a publication, or would be great to listen to regardless of the fact that it was an assignment. Here’s a few examples.

From the Sound Design class;

  • Synthesizing THX’s audio trademark, Deep Note. This is a complex sound, ‘a distinctive synthesized crescendo that glissandos from a low rumble to a high pitch’. It was created by the legendary James Moorer, who is responsible for some of the greatest papers ever published in the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society.
  • Recreating the sound of a Space Shuttle launch, with separate components for ‘Air Burning/Lapping’ and ‘Flame Eruption/Flame Exposing’ by generating the sounds of the Combustion chain and the Exhaust chain.
  • A student created a soundscape inspired by the 1968 Romanian play ‘Jonah (A four scenes tragedy)’,  written by Marin Sorescu. Published in 1968, when Romania was ruled by the communist regime. By carefully modulating the volume of filtered noise, she was able to achieve some great synthesis of waves crashing on a shore.
  • One student made a great drum and bass track, manipulating samples and mixing in some of his own recorded sounds. These included a nice ‘thud’ by filtering the sound of a tightened towel, percussive sounds by shaking rice in a plastic container. and the sizzling sound of frying bacon for tape hiss.
  • Synthesizing the sound of a motorbike, including engine startup, gears and driving sound, gear lever click and indicator.
  • A short audio piece to accompany a ghost story, using synthesised and recorded sounds. What I really like is that the student storyboarded it.

storyboard

  • A train on a stormy day, which had the neat trick of converting a footstep synthesis model into the chugging of a train.
  • The sounds of the London Underground, doors sliding and beeping, bumps and breaks… all fully synthesized.

And from the Digital Audio Effects class;

  • An autotune specifically for bass guitar. We discussed auto-tune and its unusual history previously.
  • Sound wave propagation causes temperature variation, but speed of sound is a function of temperature. Notably, the positive half cycle of a wave (compression) causes an increase in temperature and velocity, while the negative half (rarefaction) causes a decrease in temperature and velocity, turning a sine wave into something like a sawtooth. This effect is only significant in high pressure sound waves. Its also frequency dependent; high frequency components travel faster than low frequency components.
    Mark Daunt created a MIDI instrument as a VST Plug-in that generates sounds based on this shock-wave formation formula. Sliders allow the user to adjust parameters in the formula and use a MIDI keyboard to play tones that express characteristics of the calculated waveforms.

  • Synthesizing applause, a subject which we have discussed here before. The student has been working in this area for another project, but made significant improvements for the assignment, including adding presets for various conditions.
  • A student devised a distortion effect based on waveshaping in the form of a weighted sum of Legendre polynomials. These are interesting functions and her resulting sounds are surprising and pleasing. Its the type of work that could be taken a lot further.
  • One student had a bug in an implementation of a filter. Noticing that it created some interesting sounds, he managed to turn it into a cool original distortion effect.
  • There’s an Octagon-shaped room with strange acoustics here on campus. Using a database of impulse response measurements from the room, one student created a VST plug-in that allows the user to hear how audio sounds for any source and microphone positions. In earlier blog entries, we discussed related topics, acoustic reverberators and anechoic chambers.

Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 20.21.58-14

  • Another excellent sounding audio effect was a spectral delay using the phase vocoder, with delays applied differently depending on frequency bin. This created a sound like ‘stars falling from the sky’. Here’s a sine sweep before and after the effect is applied.

https://soundcloud.com/justjosh71/sine-sweep-original

There were many other interesting assignments (plucked string effect for piano synthesizer, enhanced chorus effects, inharmonic resonator, an all-in-one plug-in to recreate 80s rock/pop guitar effects…). But this selection really shows both the talent of the students and the possibilities to create new and interesting sounds.