Cool sound design and audio effects projects

Every year, I teach two classes (modules), Sound Design and Digital Audio Effects. In both classes, the final assignment involves creating an original work that involves audio programming and using concepts taught in class. But the students also have a lot of free reign to experiment and explore their own ideas. Last year, I had a well received blog entry about the projects.

The results are always great. Lots of really cool ideas, many of which could lead to a publication, or would be great to listen to regardless of the fact that it was an assignment. Here’s a few of the projects this year.

From the Sound Design class;

  • A truly novel abstract sound synthesis (amplitude and frequency modulation) where parameters are controlled by pitch recognition and face recognition machine learning models, using the microphone and the webcam. Users could use their voice and move their face around to affect the sound.
  • An impressive one had six sound models: rain, bouncing ball, sea waves, fire, wind and explosions. It also had a website where each synthesised sound could be compared against real recordings. We couldn’t always tell which was real and which was synthesised!

SoundSelect.png

  • An auditory model of a London Underground train, from the perspective of a passenger on a train, or waiting at a platform. It had a great animation.

train

  • Two projects involved creating interactive soundscapes auralising an image. One involved a famous photo taken by the photographer, Gregory Crewdson. encapsulating  a dark side of suburban America through surreal, cinematic imagery. The other was an estate area, where there are no bodies visible , giving the impression of an eerie atmosphere where background noises and small sounds are given prominence.

And from the Digital Audio Effects class;

  • A create-your-own distortion effect, where the user can interactively modify the wave shaping curve.
  • Input dependant modulation signal based on the physical mass/ spring system
  • A Swedish death metal guitar effect combining lots of effects for a very distinctive sound
  • A very creative all-in-one audio toy, ‘Ring delay’. This  augmented ping-pong delay effect gives controls over the panning of the delays, the equalization of the audio input and delays, and the output gain. Delays can be played backwards, and the output can be set out-of-phase. Finally, a ring modulator can modulate the audio input to create new sounds to be delayed.
  • Chordify, which transforms an incoming signal, ideally individual notes, into a chord of three different pitches.

chordify

  • An audio effects chain inspired by interning at a local radio station. The student helped the owner produce tracks using effects chain presets. But this producers understanding of compressors, EQ, distortion effects… was fairly limited. So the student recreated one of the effects chains into a plugin that only has two adjustable parameters which control multiple parameters inside. 
  • Old Styler, a plug-in that applies sort of a ‘vintage’ effect so that it sounds like from an old radio or an old, black and white movie. Here’s how it sounds.
  • There were some advanced reverbs, including a VST implementation of a state-of-the-art reverberation algorithm known as a Scattering Delay Network (SDN), and a Church reverb incorporating some additional effects to get that ‘church sound’ just right.
  • A pretty amazing cave simulator, with both reverb and random water droplet sounds as part of the VST plug-in.

CaveSimulator

  • A bit crusher, which also had noise, downsampling and filtering to allow lots of ways to degrade the signal.
  • A VST implementation of the Euclidian Algorithm for world rhythms as described by Goddfried Toussaint in his paper The Euclidean Algorithm Generates Traditional Musical Rhythms.
  • A mid/side processor, with excellent analysis to verify that the student got the implementation just right.
  • Multi-functional distortion pedal. Guitarists often compose music in their bedroom and would benefit from having an effect to facilitate filling the song with a range of sounds, traditionally belonging to other instruments. That’s what this plug-in did, using a lot of clever tricks to widen the soundstage of the guitar.
  • Related to the multi-functional distortion, two students created multiband distortion effects.
  • A Python project that separates a track into harmonic, percussive, and residual components which can be adjusted individually.
  • An effect that attempts to resynthesise any audio input with sine wave oscillators that take their frequencies from the well-tempered scale. This goes far beyond auto-tune, yet can be quite subtle.
  • A source separator plug-in based on Dan Barry’s ADRESS algorithm, described here and here. Along with Mikel Gainza, Dan Barry cofounded the company Sonic Ladder, which released the successful software Riffstation, based on their research.

There were many other interesting assignments, including several variations on tape emulation. But this selection really shows both the talent of the students and the possibilities to create new and interesting sounds.

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