The Mix Evaluation Dataset

Still at the upcoming International Conference on Digital Audio Effects in Edinburgh, 5-8 September, our group’s Brecht De Man will be presenting a paper on his Mix Evaluation Dataset (a pre-release of which can be read here).
It is a collection of mixes and evaluations of these mixes, amassed over the course of his PhD research, that has already been the subject of several studies on best practices and perception of mix engineering processes.
With over 180 mixes of 18 different songs, and evaluations from 150 subjects totalling close to 13k statements (like ‘snare drum too dry’ and ‘good vocal presence’), the dataset is certainly the largest and most diverse of its kind.

Unlike the bulk of previous research in this topic, the data collection methodology presented here has maximally preserved ecological validity by allowing participating mix engineers to use representative, professional tools in their preferred environment. Mild constraints on software, such as the agreement to use the DAW’s native plug-ins, means that mixes can be recreated completely and analysed in depth from the DAW session files, which are also shared.

The listening test experiments offered a unique opportunity for the participating mix engineers to receive anonymous feedback from peers, and helped create a large body of ratings and free-field text comments. Annotation and analysis of these comments further helped understand the relative importance of various music production aspects, as well as correlate perceptual constructs (such as reverberation amount) with objective features.

Proportional representation of processors in subjective comments

An interface to browse the songs, audition the mixes, and dissect the comments is provided at http://c4dm.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/multitrack/MixEvaluation/, from where the audio (insofar the source is licensed under Creative Commons, or copyrighted but available online) and perceptual evaluation data can be downloaded as well.

The Mix Evaluation Dataset browsing interface

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Behind the spectacular sound of ‘Dunkirk’ – with Richard King: — A Sound Effect

The post Behind the spectacular sound of ‘Dunkirk’ – with Richard King: appeared first on A Sound Effect. Its an interesting interview giving deep insights into sound design and soundscape creation for film. It caught my attention first because of the mention of Richard King. But its not Richard King, Grammy award winning professor in sound recording at University of McGill. Its the other one, the Oscar award winning supervising sound editor at Warner Brothers Sound.

We collaborated with Prof. Richard King on a couple of papers. In [1], we conducted an experiment where eight songs were each mixed by eight different engineers. We analysed audio features from the multitracks and mixes. This allowed us to test various assumed rules of mixing practice. In the follow-up [2], the mixes were all rated by experienced test subjects. We used the ratings to investigate relationships between perceived mix quality and sonic features of the mixes.

[1] B. De Man, M. Boerum, B. Leonard, R. King, G. Massenburg and J. D. Reiss, ‘Perceptual Evaluation of Music Mixing Practices,’ 138th Audio Engineering Society (AES) Convention, May 2015

[2] B. De Man, B. Leonard, R. King and Joshua D. Reiss, “An analysis and evaluation of audio features for multitrack music mixtures,” 15th Int. Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference (ISMIR-14), Taipei, Taiwan, Oct. 2014

via Behind the spectacular sound of ‘Dunkirk’ – with Richard King: — A Sound Effect

AES Berlin 2017: Keynotes from the technical program

aes2017

The 142nd AES Convention was held last month in the creative heart of Berlin. The four-day program and its more than 2000 attendees covered several workshops, tutorials, technical tours and special events, all related to the latest trends and developments in audio research. But as much as scale, it’s attention to detail that makes AES special. There’s an emphasis on the research side of audio topics as much as the side of panels of experts discussing a range of provocative and practical topics.

It can be said that 3D Audio: Recording and Reproduction, Binaural Listening and Audio for VR were the most popular topics among workshops, tutorial, papers and engineering briefs. However, a significant portion of the program was also devoted to common audio topics such as digital filter design, live audio, loudspeaker design, recording, audio encoding, microphones, and music production techniques just to name a few.

For this reason, here at the Audio Engineering research team within C4DM, we bring you what we believe were the highlights, the key talks or the most relevant topics that took place during the convention.

The future of mastering

What better way to start AES than with a mastering experts’ workshop discussing about the future of the field?  Jonathan Wyner (iZotope) introduced us to the current challenges that this discipline faces.  This related to the demographic, economic and target formatting issues that are constantly evolving and changing due to advances in the music technology industry and its consumers.

When discussing the future of mastering, the panel was reluctant to a fully automated future. But pointed out that the main challenge of assistive tools is to understand artistry intentions and genre-based decisions without the need of the expert knowledge of the mastering engineer. Concluding that research efforts should go towards the development of an intelligent assistant, able to function as an smart preset that provides master engineers a starting point.

Virtual analog modeling of dynamic range compression systems

This paper described a method to digitally model an analogue dynamic range compression. Based on the analysis of processed and unprocessed audio waveforms, a generic model of dynamic range compression is proposed and its parameters are derived from iterative optimization techniques.

Audio samples were reproduced and the quality of the audio produced by the digital model was demonstrated. However, it should be noted that the parameters of the digital compressor can not be changed, thus, this could be an interesting future work path, as well as the inclusion of other audio effects such as equalizers or delay lines.

Evaluation of alternative audio mixing interfaces

In the paperFormal Usability Evaluation of Audio Track Widget Graphical Representation for Two-Dimensional Stage Audio Mixing Interface‘  an evaluation of different graphical track visualization styles is proposed. Multitrack visualizations included text only, different colour conventions for circles containing text or icons related to the type of instruments, circles with opacity assigned to audio features and also a traditional channel strip mixing interface.

Efficiency was tested and it was concluded that subjects preferred instrument icons as well as the traditional mixing interface. In this way, taking into account several works and proposals on alternative mixing interfaces (2D and 3D), there is still a lot of scope to explore on how to build an intuitive, efficient and simple interface capable of replacing the good known channel strip.

Perceptually motivated filter design with application to loudspeaker-room equalization

This tutorial, was based on the engineering briefQuantization Noise of Warped and Parallel Filters Using Floating Point Arithmetic’  where warped parallel filters are proposed, which aim to have the frequency resolution of the human ear.

Thus, via Matlab, we explored various approaches for achieving this goal, including warped FIR and IIR, Kautz, and fixed-pole parallel filters. Providing in this way a very useful tool that can be used for various applications such as room EQ, physical modelling synthesis and perhaps to improve existing intelligent music production systems.

Source Separation in Action: Demixing the Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl

Abbey Road’s James Clarke presented a great poster with the actual algorithm that was used for the remixed, remastered and expanded version of The Beatles’ album Live at the Hollywood Bowl. The method achieved to isolate the crowd noise, allowing to separate into clean tracks everything that Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Ringo Starr and George Harrison played live in 1964.

The results speak for themselves (audio comparison). Thus, based on a Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) algorithm, this work provides a great research tool for source separation and reverse-engineer of mixes.

Other keynotes worth to mention:

Close Miking Empirical Practice Verification: A Source Separation Approach

Analysis of the Subgrouping Practices of Professional Mix Engineers

New Developments in Listening Test Design

Data-Driven Granular Synthesis

A Study on Audio Signal Processed by “Instant Mastering” Services

The rest of the paper proceedings are available in the AES E-library.