Audiology and audio production PhD studentship available for UK residents

BBC R&D and Queen Mary University of London’s School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science have an ICASE PhD studentship available for a talented researcher. It will involve researching the idea of intelligent mixing of broadcast audio content for hearing impaired audiences.

Perceptual Aspects of Broadcast Audio Mixing for Hearing Impaired Audiences

Project Description

This project will explore new approaches to audio production to address hearing loss, a growing concern with an aging population. The overall goal is to investigate, implement and validate original strategies for mixing broadcast content such that it can be delivered with improved perceptual quality for hearing impaired people.

Soundtracks for television and radio content typically have dialogue, sound effects and music mixed together with normal-hearing listeners in mind. But a hearing impairment may result in this final mix sounding muddy and cluttered. First, hearing aid strategies will be investigated, to establish their limitations and opportunities for improving upon them with object- based audio content. Then different mixing strategies will be implemented to counteract the hearing impairment. These strategies will be compared against each other in extensive listening tests, to establish preferred approaches to mixing broadcast audio content.

Requirements and details

This is a fully funded, 4 year studentship which includes tuition fees, travel and consumables allowance and a stipend covering living expenses.

Skills in signal processing, audio production and auditory models are preferred, though we encourage any interested and talented researchers to apply. A successful candidate will have an academic background in engineering, science or maths.

The student will be based in London. Time will be spent  between QMUL’s Audio Engineering team (the people behind this blog) in the Centre for Digital Music and BBC R&D South Lab, with a minimum of six months at each.

The preferred start date is January 2nd, 2019.
All potential candidates must meet UK residency requirements, e.g. normally EU citizen with long-term residence in the UK. Please check the regulations if you’re unsure.

If interested, please contact Prof. Josh Reiss at joshua.reiss@qmul.ac.uk .

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My favorite sessions from the 143rd AES Convention

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Recently, several researchers from the audio engineering research team here attended the 143rd Audio Engineering Society Convention in New York. Before the Convention, I wrote a blog entry highlighting a lot of the more interesting or adventurous research that was being presented there. As is usually the case at these Conventions, I have so many meetings to attend that I miss out on a lot of highlights, even ones that I flag up beforehand as ‘must see’. Still, I managed to attend some real gems this time, and I’ll discuss a few of them here.

I’m glad that I attended ‘Audio Engineering with Hearing Loss—A Practical Symposium’ . Hearing loss amongst musicians, audiophiles and audio engineers is an important topic that needs more attention. Overexposure, both prolonged and too loud, is a major cause of hearing dage. In addition to all the issues it causes for anybody, for those in the industry, it affects their ability to work or even appreciate their passion. The session had lots of interesting advice.

The most interesting presentation in the session was from Richard Einhorn, a composer and music producer. In 2010, he lost much of his hearing due to a virus. He woke up one day to find that he had completely lost hearing in his right ear, a condition known as Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. This then evolved into hyperacusis, with extreme distortion, excessive volume and speech intelligibility. In many ways, deafness in the right ear would have been preferred. On top of that, his left ear suffered otosclerosis, where everything was at greatly reduced volume. And given that this was his only functioning ear, the risk of surgery to correct it was too great.

Richard has found some wonderful ways to still function, and even continue working in audio and music, with the limited hearing he still has. There’s a wonderful description of them in Hearing Loss Magazine, and they include the use of the ‘Companion Mic,’ which allowed him to hear from many different locations around a busy, noisy environment, like a crowded restaurant.

Thomas Lund presented ‘The Bandwidth of Human Perception and its Implications for Pro Audio.’ I really wasn’t sure about this before the Convention. I had read the abstract, and thought it might be some meandering, somewhat philosophical talk about hearing perception, with plenty of speculation but lacking in substance. I was very glad to be proven wrong! It had aspects of all of that, but in a very positive sense. It was quite rigorous, essentially a systematic review of research in the field that had been published in medical journals. It looks at the question of auditory perceptual bandwidth, where bandwidth is in a general information theoretic and cognitive sense, not specifically frequency range. The research revolves around the fact that, though we receive many megabits of sensory information every second, it seems that we only use dozens of bits per second of information in our higher level perception. This has lots of implications for listening test design, notably on how to deal with aspects like sample duration or training of participants. This was probably the most fascinating technical talk I saw at the Convention.

There were two papers that I had flagged up as having the most interesting titles, ‘Influence of Audience Noises on the Classical Music Perception on the Example of Anti-cough Candies Unwrapping Noise’, and ‘Acoustic Levitation—Standing Wave Demonstration.’ I had an interesting chat with an author of the first one, Adam Pilch. When walking around much later looking for the poster for the second one, I bump into Adam again. Turns out, he was a co-author on both of them! It looks like Adam Pilch and Bartlomiej Chojnacki (the shared authors on those papers) and their co-authors have an appreciation of the joy of doing research for fun and curiousity, and an appreciation for a good paper title.

Leslie Ann Jones was the Heyser lecturer. The Heyser lecture, named after Richard C. Heyser, is an evening talk given by an eminent individual in audio engineering or related fields. Leslie has had a fascinating career, and gave a talk that makes one realise just how much the industry is changing and growing, and how important are the individuals and opportunities that one encounters in a career.

The last session I attended was also one of the best. Chris Pike, who recently became leader of the audio research team at BBC R&D (he has big shoes to fill, but fits them well and is already racing ahead), presented ‘What’s This? Doctor Who with Spatial Audio!’ . I knew this was going to be good because it involved two of my favorite things, but it was much better than that. The audience were all handed headphones so that they could listen to binaural renderings used throughout the presentation. I love props at technical talks! I also expected the talk to focus almost completely on the binaural, 3d sound rendering for a recent episode, but it was so much more than that. There was quite detailed discussion of audio innovation throughout the more than 50 years of Doctor Who, some of which we have discussed when mentioning Daphne Oram and Delia Derbyshire in our blog entry on female pioneers in audio engineering.

There’s a nice short interview with Chris and colleagues Darran Clement (sound mixer) and Catherine Robinson (audio supervisor) about the binaural sound in Doctor Who on BBC R&D’s blog, and here’s a youtube video promoting the binaural sound in the recent episode;