Aeroacoustic Sound Effects – Journal Article

I am delighted to be able to announce that my article on Creating Real-Time Aeroacoustic Sound Effects Using Physically Informed Models is in this months Journal of the Audio Engineering Society. This is an invited article following winning the best paper award at the Audio Engineering Society 141st Convention in LA. It is an open access article so free for all to download!

The article extends the original paper by examining how the Aeolian tone synthesis models can be used to create a number of sound effects. The benefits of these models are that the produce plausible sound effects which operate in real-time. Users are presented with a number of highly relevant parameters to control the effects which can be mapped directly to 3D models within game engines.

The basics of the Aeolian tone were given in a previous blog post. To summarise, a tone is generated when air passes around an object and vortices are shed behind it. Fluid dynamic equations are available which allow a prediction of the tone frequency based on the physics of the interaction between the air and object. The Aeolian tone is modelled as a compact sound source.

To model a sword or similar object a number of these compact sound sources are placed in a row. A previous blog post describes this in more detail. The majority of compact sound sources are placed at the tip as this is where the airspeed is greatest and the greatest sound is generated.

The behaviour of a sword when being swung has to be modelled which then used to control some of the parameters in the equations. This behaviour can be controlled by a game engine making fully integrated procedural audio models.

The sword model was extended to include objects like a baseball bat and golf club, as well as a broom handle. The compact sound source of a cavity tone was also added in to replicate swords which have grooved profiles. Subjective evaluation gave excellent results, especially for thicker objects which were perceived as plausible as pre-recorded samples.

The synthesis model could be extended to look at a range of sword cross sections as well as any influence of the material of the sword. It is envisaged that other sporting equipment which swing or fly through the air could be modelled using compact sound sources.

A propeller sound is one which is common in games and film and partially based on the sounds generated from the Aeolian tone and vortex shedding. As a blade passes through the air vortices are shed at a specific frequency along the length. To model individual propeller blades the profiles of a number were obtained with specific span length (centre to tip) and chord lengths (leading edge to trailing edge).

Another major sound source is the loading sounds generated by the torque and thrust. A procedure for modelling these sounds is outlined in the article. Missing from the propeller model is distortion sounds. These are more associated with rotors which turn in the horizontal plane.

An important sound when hearing a propeller powered aircraft is the engine sound. The one taken for this model was based on one of Andy Farnell’s from his book Designing Sound. Once complete a user is able to select an aircraft from a pre-programmed bank and set the flight path. If linked to a game engine the physical dimensions and flight paths can all be controlled procedurally.

Listening tests indicate that the synthesis model was as plausible as an alternative method but still not as plausible as pre-recorded samples. It is believed that results may have been more favourable if modelling electric-powered drones and aircraft which do not have the sound of a combustion engine.

The final model exploring the use of the Aeolian tone was that of an Aeolian Harp. This is a musical instrument that is activated by wind blowing around the strings. The vortices that are shed behind the string can activate a mechanical vibration if they are around the frequency of one of the strings natural harmonics. This produces a distinctive sound.

The digital model allows a user to synthesis a harp of up to 13 strings. Tension, mass density, length and diameter can all be adjusted to replicate a wide variety of string material and harp size. Users can also control a wind model modified from one presented in Andy Farnell’s book Designing Sound, with control over the amount of gusts. Listening tests indicate that the sound is not as plausible as pre-recorded ones but is as plausible as alternative synthesis methods.

The article describes the design processes in more detail as well as the fluid dynamic principles each was developed from. All models developed are open source and implemented in pure data. Links to these are in the paper as well as my previous publications. Demo videos can be found on YouTube.

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The edgiest tone yet…

As my PhD is coming to an end and the writing phase is getting more intense, it seemed about time I described the last of the aeroacoustic sounds I have implemented as a sound effect model. May 24th at the 144th Audio Engineering Society Convention in Milan, I will present ‘Physically Derived Synthesis Model of an Edge Tone.’
The edge tone is the sound created when a planar jet of air strikes an edge or wedge. The edge tone is probably most often seen as means of excitation for flue instruments. These instruments are ones like a recorder, piccolo, flute and pipe organ. For example, in a recorder air is blown by the mouth through a mouthpiece into a planar jet and then onto a wedge. The forces generated couple with the tube body of the recorder and a tone based on the dimension of the tube is generated.

 

Mouthpiece of a recorder

 

The edge tone model I have developed is viewed in isolation rather than coupled to a resonator as in the musical instruments example. While researching the edge tone it seemed clear to me that this tone has not had the same attention as the Aeolian tone I have previously modelled (here) but a volume of research and data was available to help understand and develop this model.

How does the edge tone work?

The most important process in generating the edge tone is the set up of a feedback loop from the nozzle exit to the wedge. This is similar to the process that generates the cavity tone which I discussed here. The diagram below will help with the explanation.

 

Illustration of jet of air striking a wedge

 

The air comes out of the nozzle and travels towards the wedge. A jet of air naturally has some instabilities which are magnified as the jet travels and reaches the wedge. At the wedge, vortices are shed on opposite sides of the wedge and an oscillating pressure pulse is generated. The pressure pulse travels back towards the nozzle and re-enforces the instabilities. At the correct frequency (wavelength) a feedback loop is created and a strong discrete tone can be heard.

 

 

To make the edge tone more complicated, if the air speed is varied or the distance between the nozzle exit to the wedge is varies, different modes exist. The values at which the modes change also exhibit hysteresis – the mode changes up and down do not occur at the same airspeed or distance.

Creating a synthesis model

There are a number of equations defined by researchers from the fluid dynamics field, each unique but depend on an integer mode number. Nowhere in my search did I find a method of predicting the mode number. Unlike previous modelling approaches, I decided to collate all the results I had where the mode number was given, both wind tunnel measurements and computational simulations. These were then input to the Weka machine learning workbench and a decision tree was devised. This was then implemented to predict the mode number.

 

All the prediction equations had a significant error compared to the measured and simulated results so again the results were used to create a new equation to predict the frequency for each mode.

 

With the mode predicted and the subsequent frequency predicted, the actual sound synthesis was generated by noise shaping with a white noise source and a bandpass filter. The Q value for the filter was unknown but, as with the cavity tone, it is known that the more turbulent the flow the smaller and more diffuse the vortices and the wider the band of frequencies around the predicted edge tone is. The Q value for the bandpass was set to be proportional to this.

And what next…?

Unlike the Aeolian tone where I was able to create a number of sound effects, the edge tone has not yet been implemented into a wider model. This is due to time rather than anything else. One area of further development which would be of great interest would be to couple the edge tone model to a resonator to emulate a musical instrument. Some previous synthesis models use a white noise source and an excitation or a signal based on the residual between an actual sample and the model of the resonator.

 

Once a standing wave has been established in the resonator, the edge tone locks in at that frequency rather than the one predicted in the equation. So the predicted edge tone may only be present while a musical note is in the transient state but it is known that this has a strong influence over the timbre and may have interesting results.

 

For an analysis of whistles and how their design affects their sound check out his article. The feedback mechanism described for the edge tone also very similar to the one that generates the hole tone. This is the discrete tone that is generated by a boiling kettle. This is usually a circular jet striking a plate with a circular hole and a feedback loop established.

 

Hole tone form a kettle

 

A very similar tone can be generated by a vertical take-off and landing vehicle when the jets from the lift fans are pointing down to the ground or deck. These are both areas for future development and where interesting sound effects could be made.

 

Vertical take-off of a Harrier jet

 

SMC Conference, Espoo, Finland

I have recently returned from the 14th Sound and Music Computing Conference hosted by Aalto University, Espoo, Finland. All 4 days were full of variety and quality, ensuring there was something of interest for all. There was also live performances during an afternoon session and 2 evenings as well as the banquet on Hanasaari, a small island in Espoo. This provided a friendly framework for all the delegates to interact, making or renew connections.
The paper presentations were the main content of the programme with presenters from all over the globe. Papers that stood out for me were Johnty Wang et al – Explorations with Digital Control of MIDI-enabled Pipe Organs where I heard the movement of an unborn child control the audio output of a pipe organ. I became aware of the Championship of Standstill where participants are challenged to standstill while a number of musical pieces are played – The Musical Influence on People’s Micromotion when Standing Still in Groups.
Does Singing a Low-Pitch Tone Make You Look Angrier? well it looked like it in  this interesting presentation! A social media music app was presented in Exploring Social Mobile Music with Tiny Touch-Screen Performances where we can interact with others by layering 5 second clips of sound to create a collaborative mix.
Analysis and synthesis was well represented with a presentation on Virtual Analog Simulation and Extensions of Plate Reverberation by Silvan Willemson et al and The Effectiveness of Two Audiovisual Mappings to Control a Concatenate Synthesiser by Augoustinos Tiros et al. The paper on Virtual Analog Model of the Lockhart Wavefolder explaining a method of modelling West Coast style analogue synthesiser.
Automatic mixing was also represented. Flavio Everard’s paper on Towards an Automated Multitrack Mixing Tool using Answer Set Programming, citing at least 8 papers from the Intelligent Audio Engineering group at C4DM.
In total 65 papers were presented orally or in the poster sessions with sessions on Music performance analysis and rendering, Music information retrieval, Spatial sound and sonification, Computer music languages and software, Analysis, synthesis and modification of sound, Social interaction, Computer-based music analysis and lastly Automatic systems and interactive performance. All papers are available at http://smc2017.aalto.fi/proceedings.html.
Award2
Having been treated to a wide variety of live music, technical papers and meeting colleagues from around the world, it was a added honour to be presented with one of the Best Paper Awards for our paper on Real-Time Physical Model for Synthesis of Sword Sounds. The conference closed with a short presentation from the next host….. SMC2018 – Cyprus!